A Hodge Podge of my Knowledge of the MBTI

The inspiration for this post is from this article I encountered today.

The MBTI, or Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, is a popular personality test. I’ve taken it and shared my results on my about page, INTX. I find the concept fascinating, even though it’s pseudoscience.

The test was designed by Isabel Briggs Myers building on work her mother Katherine Cook Briggs did. Neither had backgrounds in psychology. Myers was an author, so I would argue she had some understanding of people, but that is still not the same. They built loosely on the work of Carl Jung and his concept of cognitive functions, though Jung himself did not support the MBTI.

As far as using the MBTI as a tool for self-discovery goes, it may or may not have results that accurately reflect the test taker. I can think of a few different people I know who either test differently every time or don’t think they really fit any of the types. I found it fascinating, mostly because the details about my “type” seemed so accurate, to a superficial degree.

People change over time as they learn, grow, and have more experiences. Personality is not a concrete, unchangeable aspect of an individual. The MBTI seems to purport itself to be an unchanging assignment to one of sixteen boxes.

According to the article I read today, the MBTI was intended to be used by companies to place employees in roles they were better suited for. By placing people in a specific box according to their test answers, they could determine that Sally would be better in customer service and Joe would be better in programming. This could be wildly off base, however, depending on other factors and prior knowledge. For example, I’m very introverted and favor thinking over feeling, so a company using the test might think I’d be a bad fit for a customer service role. In actuality, I enjoy customer service and helping people; I’ve had Walmart customers tell me I’m the most helpful associate they’ve interacted with and my manager said I was excellent at it.

I’m fascinated by the MBTI and personality tests in general. I’m adding the books mentioned in the article to my reading list for further examination, so I will likely discuss this again in the future.

In the meantime, share your type and thoughts on the MBTI in the comments!

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