Some Thoughts on NaNo

It’s November, and while I’m not participating in NaNoWriMo, I have in the past and I have friends who are doing it.

At a basic level, NaNo is a 30-day writing challenge, in a similar vein to the month-long personal development projects (PDPs) that are encouraged by Praxis. You spend a month focusing as much time and energy as possible on one goal, one endeavor. At the end, if you’ve spent time each day working toward the goal, you win.

If you don’t write 50k words in November, it doesn’t matter. That’s not the real purpose. If you do, congratulations.

You really win by forming a writing habit and spending focused time working towards a goal, in this case to write a novel, for 30 straight days.

You can make your own rules.

You can set a challenging but obtainable word count goal for yourself. Maybe 50k is too much but you can handle 15 or 20 or even 30k words. Don’t aim so high that you’ll be guaranteed to burn out.

You don’t have to write fiction. You could write poems, blog posts, a non-fiction book, a series of essays. Whatever genre or type of writing you want.

If you really want to, you could decide to do an entirely different month-long project. In fact, I’d encourage you to do some kind of month-long project, NaNo or otherwise.

I’m not doing NaNo, but I am doing a PDP. For the whole month of November, I will be marketing my poetry collection, posting on social media, interacting with people, and creating blog posts and videos about self-publishing.

That’s my project this month.

Tell me about yours in the comments below!

5 30-Day Project Ideas

Next month in Praxis, we’re focusing on portfolio projects. This week we are thinking about and preparing for that. For that reason, here are five ideas for potential projects.

  1. Market my poetry collection Inside a Writer’s Head by producing blog posts about writing poetry, creating a collection, and self-publishing through BookBaby. Bring people who are interested in writing to me and my collection by teaching them about making their own. I would also share posts on Facebook and Twitter, and I might “boost” some posts. This would include planning and scheduling content, interacting with people on social media, and clearly articulating what I learned while making the collection.
  2. Make Facebook and/or Twitter ads for my poetry collection, targeting people who are interested in writing, poetry, and self-publishing. Make posts compelling to peak interest in the collection so interest turns into sales.
  3. Make a blog post series on making and editing a poetry collection followed by a guide to self-publishing with BookBaby. Supplemental videos that go along with and expand upon the blog posts. Post ideas: choosing an organization method, formatting the collection, choosing a self-publishing method/tool/service, a guide to self-publishing ebooks with BookBaby, a guide to self-publishing physical books with BookBaby.
  4. Starting a consistent YouTube channel. Discussions of projects, short stories I’ve written, video supplementation to Recap posts, conversations with Justine about topics we cover on Over the Invisible Wall, etc.
  5. Complete a second poetry collection, taking it from nothing to published in 30 days. I have a poetry collection that only has a title and a cover image that could work for this. It might not be the best time for this project, though, since I just did this for Inside a Writer’s Head.