Apprenticeship Week 3

It’s already been three weeks that I’ve worked at Original One Parts.

Projects this Week

Early in the week I finished the Hubspot/Salespad project I was assigned my first week. I have no more paperwork from old orders to deal with!

After I finished that, I was asked to sort a spreadsheet with all of our part numbers and descriptions indicating the type of part it is. Ever single item sku and number code was listed. I had to delete all but one of each letter code and change the description to just have the part that letter code refers to. There were over 1000 rows in the sheet initially and now there are fewer than 200. They were also all in lowercase, so I learned how to use =upper, =lower, and =proper in Excel to change that.

The next day, I was assigned a spreadsheet of Kayce’s previous calls to go through. I have to add the date, her initials, and her call notes to the Salespad CRM tab. When I finish this it’s possible I’ll do the same for old daily call logs but I’m not sure.

Things I Learned this Week

I’ve gotten more comfortable answering the phone and feel confident in doing so. This week I learned how to get information to process a return, pay an invoice, and send pictures of surplus parts.

Other Updates

Thursday on my way home from work traffic was backed up and it was very stop and go. I stopped in an exit lane to get from one highway to another, and the car behind me didn’t slow down fast enough. I got rear ended. No one got hurt, but the front of their car got bent up pretty bad, and my rear end needs replaced and the exhaust is rubbing.

I didn’t go in Friday so I could talk to my insurance company and the body shop that will be handling my repairs.

Next week because of Memorial Day I will be working Tuesday through Friday.

Apprenticeship Week 1

Monday was my first day at in my new role at Original One Parts! I’m on inbound sales and data entry and I learned a lot about the company from working closely with the rest of the sales team.

My first week was crazy.

Monday I was logged in as a recently-moved-on sales team member. I had my own email address but it was a while before I had a login for the software we use – SalesPad and PartsTrader. So I spent most of my first day watching the Friday Fast Facts videos on the company’s Youtube channel, looking around the website, and practicing the PartsTrader orders on my manager Herb’s computer. After lunch I received login information for SalesPad and PartsTrader so I was able to work on my own a bit more.
PartsTrader is a website that car repair shops use to source refurbished, recycled, and OEM parts for their customers’ vehicles. Original One Parts is a supplier of refinished OEM parts. They’re parts that have previously been on vehicles, but we have a rigorous inspection process to ensure they’re the same quality as the original. Then we put a new finish on the part so it looks brand new. Our customers request quotes for parts, which go through automatically, and put in orders for parts.
When they put in an order for a part through PartsTrader, I check the VIN and the part number for a match with our customer service portal. Once I know I have a match, I pull up the repair shop in SalesPad, check that we have the part in stock, and write the invoice.
Between the PartsTrader orders, I learned how to enter information about contacts and companies in Hubspot and SalesPad so we have a database of our customers. I also figured out on my own how to merge duplicate companies in Hubspot, because that is a common problem with the information we have on Hubspot.

Tuesday I was set up with my own login to the computer instead of the old team member’s. I didn’t have SalesPad on my desktop at all. So I spent a few hours just working on updating the information in Hubspot from printed out copies of previous orders. After I got set up with SalesPad I caught up with the PartsTrader orders.
This was the first day I had a problem. I ran into some surplus parts on orders. These vary a lot more than other parts, so we typically send the customer pictures to verify that it is correct and they’re okay with the condition. I put an order through for a surplus part without knowing this. One of my coworkers, Kayce, informed me and then called the customer at my desk so I could listen in.

Wednesday I mastered processing orders from a different platform called CCC. These come in already partially invoiced, so I have to check for the part in the inventory and fill out the shipping information.
I had the first order on PartsTrader that I had to cancel because we didn’t have the part in stock. Herb had me listen in on a call to the customer letting them know that we were canceling their PartsTrader order for (part) on (vehicle) because we didn’t have any in stock.
I made a lot of progress on the customer details I was entering on Hubspot and SalesPad. I almost finished the file folder I was working through.

Thursday I finished the first stack of paperwork. Then it turned out all the other papers in the desk drawer were the same thing and I have a heck of a lot more still. I didn’t run into any problems that I remember. It went really well and I got a lot done.

Today, Friday, I had more than half the sales for the day! I had one order for two mirrors on a Chevy Tahoe that was around $650! We were slower and the other sales team members were not having much luck with their outbound sales calls.
The best part of the day was when Herb called one lady and she said she was going to transfer him to the voicemail of the person he needed to talk to. She transferred him to her own voicemail!

My first week was crazy. I learned a lot and got a lot of work done. Monday morning I’m going to show up and kick some more butt.

Being Wrong but Useful

Alyssa Wright reflects on how creating value and being right don’t always align. Beliefs shape lives, but the utility of those beliefs is often more important than their truth.

We all want to be right, to have a true understanding and right perspective on the world around us. We look around at different perspectives that clash with our own and think those people are ignorant, stupid, or evil. We look into the past and see all the times people were wrong and laugh at how stupid they were.

But in the future, people will look back and laugh at us and how stupid we are. Are, as in right now in this current moment. We are wrong about a lot of things, and don’t even know it. Probably a majority of what we believe to be true isn’t.

In some cases, our wrong beliefs have a functionality. If they have enough sense, they cohere with the rest of our understanding of the world. In science, models are simplifications of reality. In the past, models for atoms were incorrect or an oversimplification. But in high school chemistry class we still learn about Bohr’s model of the atom before we learn about the more complex, more current models. Because there’s a usefulness in the wrongness. The model is inaccurate, but it helps simplify the concept so it is comprehensible.

For this post, I’m drawing from two videos. “On being wrong,” a TED talk by Kathryn Shulz, and “You have no idea how wrong you are,” a video I watched during Praxis last month.

We’re wrong, a lot. Kathryn Shulz said in her talk, “Being wrong feels like being right.” And it does, until or unless we realize we’re wrong. But in the realm of religion or philosophy or etiquette or any number of other things, we will never know if or that we’re wrong. We can change our minds, sure, and think we used to be wrong in what we believed, but we can’t know.

For example, I don’t believe in any god or gods. But a lot of people do. I used to. I don’t know if I’m right or if some of the people who believe in a god or gods are right. I could very easily be wrong. They could very easily be wrong. Everyone is probably wrong. And we’ll never know what’s right. But what we believe is right shapes our lives.

That most of what we think and believe is true doesn’t entirely matter. Most of it is probably wrong. Whether it works and makes sense in relation to what we know and understand of the world matters. Though most of our understanding is probably very wrong. But it works, just like Bohr’s model of the atom. It has a utility.

When we can relate to the world and to each other in a way that makes sense and use that relation to create value, we can succeed. Even if a decade, or century, or millennium from now people look back and think we’re stupid for how wrong we are. If it works and we can use it to create value and improve people’s lives, including our own, we’ve succeeded.

How right we are doesn’t matter. How much value we can create does.

First Value Prop

The details of Alyssa Wright’s first value prop, for Fundera.

Last week I created my first value prop for Fundera. They’re a business that helps other businesses get funding, make financial decisions, and learn about running or starting a business.

I wrote on my blog about learning SEO to write an article for them. I also learned about crowdfunding to dissect the pros and cons of using it. Both of those articles can be found here.

I had a lot of fun writing those two articles for Fundera. I learned a lot about SEO and crowdfunding, and I pushed myself to write quality articles in a short amount of time. I did all my research and all my writing for those two 1500+ word articles in only ten days total.

It was a bit stressful at times, but I pushed through to completion.

This week I’m working on my second value prop. I’ll share the details on that next week.

Recap: Forward Tilt Ep 40

This is part of a series of posts called Recap. In it I will share my notes on the content I consumed followed by my response. The content could vary from a podcast to an article to a Youtube video to a book I read. When applicable, I will link to the content.
I’ve also responded to Episodes 9, 29, and 36.
Episode 40 is called the Rough Draft Mindset. I’ve listened to this episode twice, first early on in Praxis and again now that I’m entering Placement.

Notes

Having raw material to work with is easier than starting from scratch. Early in the program, Praxis participants build some beginning things. First instinct is to ask open-ended questions for ideas. Once there is a rough thing, it’s easier for people to give feedback for improvement. It’s so much easier to edit when you’ve got something started. Before you seek input and advice, have a rough draft. Difference between surveying people, which is abstract, versus creating a prototype and offering something tangible. Isaac Morehouse’s son wanted to start sandwich business. The first attempt got one order, so he brought free samples and got 30 email addresses of people who liked his sandwiches and wanted to order next time.
When you want info and/or feedback, come with a rough draft. Don’t schedule a call about your idea. Have the first draft, have something tangible created and ask for feedback on it. If you get a bunch of generic feedback, you’ll be less likely to act on and talk yourself out of it. If you do a bit, you get a taste, you’re more likely to be able to adapt, respond, and not get analysis paralysis before you’ve even started.
When you have real tangible problems you can get real tangible feedback. Don’t just present an idea, ask for feedback on a rough draft.

Response

It was easier for me to build my pitch deck from a template than from scratch. When I got stuck, I looked at some of the other participants’ decks to see how they approached the deliverable. Before I shared my deck for feedback, I talked with Hannah Frankman, the pre-program advisor about an aspect I was struggling with. After I had feedback from other participants, I edited and refined my deck. Having a template and examples of what I was building (a rough draft of sorts) made it easier for me to build my pitch deck.
I’ve started from scratch on a lot of projects and had to build the base for them myself. In creating N’Zembe, I first had to decide how many planets there were, what they were called, and which of them supported life. Then I was able to expand to the size of each, the length of their rotations and revolutions. From this base I can create the geography and figure out where people live in order to create the history. To go with the history, I am creating the first language, the origin story of the language and the writing systems, etc. I keep building on and with what I’ve already created in order to create more.


Goals and Stress

I’m showing up. I’m done with today and worn out, but I’m still here.

I stayed late at work three extra hours because they needed help. One person was scheduled to be on line from 4-10 and close, so I stayed til 7.

I was gone all day and still had content to consume for Praxis, this blog to come to, Mystical Warriors to write, and the reading I want to do outside of Praxis.

It’s getting late, and I want to give myself a break. But I also want to meet all the goals I set for myself. I’m not always good at balancing my responsibilities with my leisure time. I’m aware of this. Often it seems I try to do too much of either at once and wear myself thin. Too much of work, work, work and I feel I desperately need a break. Too much fun, fun, fun and I stress myself out because I have so little time left for what I need to do. I’m still working to find a balance.

I try to do everything I need to early in the day and then relax and have leisure time in the evening/night. That’s not always what happens, but I think that works best for me.