Navigating Relationships with Co-Workers

In service jobs, the only thing as important or possibly more important than customer service is teamwork. This has been especially true at Panera Bread where the team is far smaller than at Walmart.

The customers change, but you will be working with the same handful of people day in and day out, so it’s vital that you can work together.

The Non-Worker

The only case I would say feels actually impossible is the co-worker who absolutely refuses to pull their weight. They pretend to work and do small things when the managers are watching, but they don’t do much else. This co-worker puts undue pressure on everyone else to get the work done. Never be this person. Everyone will hate working with you and you will likely get fired.

The Joker

Jokes at work can be great. You get paid to spend a block of time doing a certain set of tasks. Making it more enjoyable helps the time pass and can make the day a little better. Knowing when to stop joking is important. Understanding the difference between funny and annoying as well as what that is to who you’re working with matters. The person who loves to joke all day can either make a shift amazing or dreadful. The people and the jokes involved make the difference.

The Utility Player

I jump around to different “zones” on line. If I’m on sandwiches but have no sandwiches to make, I see if the salad person could use help or if any soups need poured. I don’t isolate myself to my bar and only do that. If someone could use help or if I don’t have anything to do, I jump in to get the food made faster overall. Some other people at work do this also, and they’re great to work with. Teamwork is magnified when at least one person does what they can to help everyone do their best.

These are the three categories of workers that I’ve seen at Walmart or Panera. Shifts can be horrible, okay, or great. The job duties may be the same, but my co-workers make a lot of the difference.

Panera Bread: Job Review

I started working at Panera Bread in May 2017 and will no longer work there after August 16th.

Based on my experience, Panera Bread is a good job for students who cannot work full time and are looking to make some money.

The training at corporate emphasizes that there is upward career movement possible within the cafe. Some of that is as simple as becoming a trainer. The line cook, bakery, or prep trainers make more per hour than the regular workers with minimal extra responsibility.

While at Panera, I learned more about teamwork and improved my ability to work with others.
I’m introverted and I was homeschooled. I never had group projects at school because I was the only student. I didn’t have experience working as a team before.
At Panera, it’s important to help coworkers, especially during a rush. If the person making salads is swamped and I don’t have sandwiches to make, I ask where they’re at and start making salads too, telling them what I’m making.
We communicate what we have done, how we’re helping, and shift back to our own job when necessary.

I learned to work under pressure.
During a rush, the time in which the order is supposed to be out remains the same. We have to work quickly and accurately to put the food together and consolidate it.
I make mistakes sometimes, and when that happens, I fix it. I’ve had times where a hot sandwich was finished, and I dropped it on the floor when I pulled it off the grill. Whatever else I was doing, I had to stop and remake that sandwich. It can be frustrating and stressful sometimes, but I ensure the food is correct and finished as quickly as possible.

Overall, Panera Bread was a good second job. It allowed me to learn skills that would help me in other jobs.